If a Florida parent is denied custodial rights over their child then they may have the option of seeking visitation time with them. Visitation can take on many different forms that will depend upon the nature of the relationship between the parent and their child. In general, visitation arrangements can be unsupervised, supervised, based on virtual communications, or nonexistent.

Unsupervised visitation is common and involves the right of a parent to spend time with their child without the presence or control of another adult. Visitation of this form is often subject to a schedule made by the custodial and noncustodial parents to accommodate the needs of the family. When a parent poses no threat or harm to their child, unsupervised visitation may be ordered.

However, when a parent has a history of violence or abuse toward their family, they may not be given unsupervised access to their child. In such cases a parent may be granted supervised visitation. Supervised visitation often takes place in a controlled environment and in the presence of a court-appointed third party.

When a parent and their child do not live in the same community, their visitation may rely on electronic means. Virtual visitation may be allowed or ordered to facilitate the relationship between a parent and child who live too far apart to see each other in real life. Not every family law case will result in an order or agreement that includes visitation. Different custodial structures will serve the needs and interests of different children, and families that would like more information about custody and visitation matters may want to discuss their questions with their family law attorneys.